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Katarzyna Krzemien

Polish

Curriculum Vitae 

since 2011

PhD student in the group of Prof. Jens Michaelis, LMU Munich

2010

European Student Exchange Program “ERASMUS” Internship, Nanomechanics Group of Prof. Jens Michaelis Department of Chemistry, Ludwig-Maximilians-University, Munich, Germany

2009 - 2010

Master of Science in Industrial Biotechnology, Faculty of Chemistry, Silesian University of Technology, Gliwice, Poland

2009 - 2010

Master thesis in the group of Prof. Zbigniew Krawczyk, Department of Tumour Biology, Comprehensive Cancer Centre, Maria Skłodowska-Curie Memorial Institute, Gliwice, Poland

Topic of Master Thesis: "Cloning of the human HSPA2 gene promoter and in silico analysis of putative cis- acting regulatory elements"

2008 - 2009

Bachelor thesis in group Prof. Zbigniew Krawczyk, Department of Tumour Biology, Comprehensive Cancer Centre, Maria Skłodowska-Curie Memorial Institute, Gliwice, Poland 

Topic of Bachelor Thesis: "In vitro study of antitumor activity of selected genistein derivatives" 

2005 - 2009

Bachelor of Science in Industrial Biotechnology, Faculty of Chemistry, Silesian University of Technology, Gliwice, Poland

 

Scholarships

since 2011

Scholarship of the IDK-NBT (Elite Network of Bavaria)

Research Project

Examination of the structure and dynamics of nucleosome arrays is the focus of my PhD thesis. The complete information about living organisms is contained in DNA. The DNA storage mechanism has to fulfil two opposing functions: a high compaction of DNA and fast access to the genomic information. DNA storage in eukaryotic cells exhibit several levels of compaction and one important structural feature is the so called chromatin fibre. In vitro, different structures of chromatin fibres, depending on the nucleosome repeat length, the presence of linker histones and the ion concentration in the fibre environment, were proposed but none of them is unambiguous. Dynamic changes between low and highly condensed chromatin are still an open question.

My project will focus on the protein engineering and establishing of novel protein-labelling strategies for STORM and STED measurements and single molecule FRET measurements. My first approach will be to label each histone octamer in the chromatin fibre to use it for both STORM and STED measurements. Using STORM microscopy will hopefully let me see the structure of the fibre with high resolution (up to 20 nm). To observe dynamic changes in fibre conformation (due to changing salt conditions or remodeler activity) I will also use STED microscopy. Finally, I am planning to use single molecular FRET measurements to have a close look at single beads in chromatin, their positions and movements. This approach requires site- specific labelling, since chromatin fibres have a complex and repetitive structure, introduction of labels at specific positions within will be difficult, nevertheless not impossible.

I believe that the unique combination of single molecule FRET with super resolution microscopy will enable me to not only directly observe chromatin structure, but also look at the dynamic changes. This innovative approach will clearly show me the details of the chromatin structure, removing the existing uncertainties in field of DNA compaction and will help to understand better control of basic DNA processes like transcription, replication, recombination and repair of the genome.